Apple announces 1,000 jobs for Cork with campus expansion

Computer giant Apple has said it intends to expand its campus in Cork and provide space for 1,000 further staff by the middle of 2017.

An expansion on this scale would see the number of people directly employed by the company in Ireland increase to 6,000.

Apple currently employs 5,000 people at the Hollyhill facility in the city, a 25% increase in a year.

The news came during a visit by the Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook to Dublin this morning.

Apple has been in Cork since 1980 and has steadily grown its presence in Ireland.

Staff are involved in a range of functions including manufacturing, customer care, finance and global supply chain management.

The announcement of a growing commitment to Ireland will settle nerves about what Apple's intentions might be if the European Commission were to make a negative finding in its tax probe.

Apple has become an important employer in Ireland and is also partnered with the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland to support research in offshore energy technology.

It is also establishing a €1m Ocean Energy Industry Fund to support innovative new ways of capturing wave energy and converting it to renewable electricity to power its facilities.

The announcement has been warmly welcomed by the Government and the IDA.

In February Apple revealed plans to build an €850 million data centre in Athenry.

Mr Cook has been honoured by the Philosophical Society at Trinity College Dublin with its Gold Medal of Honorary Patronage.

He was given the honour at a ceremony attended by hundreds of staff and students at the university this morning.

Addressing the audience Mr Cook said he was incredibly honoured and humbled to receive the award.

He said Apple has been in Ireland for 35 years, was proud to be the largest employer in Cork, and will always be proud to call Ireland home.

He said the facility here is one of the most diverse on the planet, with employees from dozens of countries.

He said Apple had been here in good times and challenging times and that it does not just see itself as based in Ireland but rooted here.

He spoke about the values that drive the workforce and about how the company wants to leave the world better than the way it found it.

Addressing the audience Mr Cook said he was incredibly honoured and humbled to receive the award.

He said Apple has been in Ireland for 35 years, was proud to be the largest employer in Cork, and will always be proud to call Ireland home.

He said the facility here is one of the most diverse on the planet, with employees from dozens of countries.

Apple had been in Ireland in good times and challenging times and he said that it does not just see itself as based in Ireland but rooted here. 

He spoke about the values that drive the workforce and about how the company wants to leave the world better than the way it found it.

He also talked about how he sees education as a fundamental human right and a profound way to shape the future.

Mr Cook praised Trinity College for the way in which it had developed through the centuries and become more religiously and socially inclusive.
He also praised Ireland for its commitment to peacekeeping through the UN - a record he said no other country could match.

Mr Cook also praised Ireland's record on fighting for human rights, making reference in particular to LGBT issues.He advised the students to write history in a way true to their values.

Asked about privacy and the UK's desire to force technology companies to not encrypt messages, Mr Cook said Apple is very pro privacy and plans to continue to encrypt end to end with no back door.

He said to weaken encryption would wind up providing a vulnerability to the very people that intelligence agencies are trying to stop.

Mr Cook also spoke about his reasons for coming out as gay last year, saying he realised that no amount of a donation he could make would have as much of an impact than him standing up and saying he was proud to be gay.

He also encouraged others from all walks of life, particularly in prominent positions, to follow suit. Earlier, following a meeting with the Taoiseach, Mr Cook was taken on a guided tour of the campus.

Meanwhile, Tánaiste Joan Burton described Apple's announcement as "a vote of confidence in Cork and in Ireland".

Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Richard Bruton said the announcements at Indeed.com and at Apple this morning showed the two sides of development in Ireland.

He said an environment has been created where ambitious companies found Ireland a location where they could grow their businesses.

The minister added that this has become a strong statement about the country, the sort of talent it grows and attracts and what can be built for the future

Source: http://www.rte.ie/news/2015/1111/741064-apple-jobs-cork/

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